Food & Drink Tastings

Co-op owner appreciation week is a time to celebrate being a community-owned store with special food and drink tastings for you.  Our owners also enjoy 10% off a shopping trip.  Not an owner?  It’s easy to join and your $200 share can be paid in annual $25 increments.  Ownership can pay for itself with the savings of just one shopping trip during owner appreciation week!

Tastings planned at Co-op for owner appreciation week February 7-13:

guacamoleDeli Dips Tasting on Sunday February 7 at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Guacamole, hummus and more… sample what we’ve been cooking and save.  All our dips are 15% off in our Fresh Deals flyer through Super Bowl Sunday.  Add that to your 10% discount for significant savings on these fresh and healthy snacks!

 

Cara-Cara-OrangesSeasonal Produce Tasting on Monday February 8 at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Come enjoy fresh samples from our produce crew.  It’s citrus season and we’ve got organic heirloom navels and cara cara navels on sale.  Learn more about our different varieties of citrus in our winter newsletter.

 

bennett milkLocal Milk Tasting on Tuesday February 9 at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Come meet the farmers from Bennett Family Farm.  This is a new product we are pleased only has to travel a short way from the green pastures of Tillamook, OR.  Now you can have milk from local cows delivered within 24 hours of bottling.  Chocolate milk also available; and farm-fresh eggs, too.

 

peggyLocal Chocolate Bar Tasting on Tuesday February 9 at 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.  Come meet Peggy Bondurant from the Blue Scorcher.  Peggy learned to make chocolate in Ecuador where she met cooperative organic chocolate farmers and sourced nibs for her cooperatively-owned bakery in Astoria.  Enjoy samples of this superior-tasting chocolate bar!

Josh and Bubbly

Wine Tasting on Wednesday February 10 at 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.  Josh Guse our grocery manager selects the wine we carry and he’ll be opening some of his favorites for you to try.  With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, Josh also plans to of course be sampling out some bubbly.  If there are wines you’ve always wondered about or have feedback and suggestions on our selections, this is a great time to visit with Josh while enjoying samples.

 

Walnut City Wineworks Tasting on Thursday February 11 at 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.  Come enjoy samples of some great Oregon wines with Dave Butler.

Stuck on Honey Fudge Tasting on Friday February 12 at 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.  With no dairy, gluten, corn, egg, or cholesterol, Stuck on Honey believes they have the healthiest version of fudge available. The company uses quality ingredients including local raw honey from sustainable beekeepers and other top quality ingredients to create this silky-smooth, “melt in your mouth” texture paired with unmatched flavor. It’s all part of the fun for Co-op owner appreciation week!

Josephson’s Smoked Fish Tasting on Saturday February 13 at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Come enjoy samples of this local fish from a local business.

Stuck on Honey Fudge Tasting on Saturday February 13 at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  The good people from Stuck on Honey will be back in the store for a second tasting in case you missed the first one (or just want to come back for another sample).

 

 

 

 

Local Organic Cranberry Juice Tasting at the Co-op

Photo by Giles ClementPhoto by Giles Clement

The farmers of Washington state’s first and only certified organic cranberry farm will be sampling out their juice at the Co-op on the first day of our Spring 2015 Owner Appreciation Week.  Stop by the store and try some on Sunday May 10 at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Starvation Alley encompasses a total of 10 acres in Seaview Washington and Long Beach. Jared Oakes and Jessika Tantisook took over the farm where Oakes grew up in 2010. They wanted to farm cranberries organically, but were told by farmers and other experts that it wasn’t possible. They explored that assumption and eventually gained organic certification for their farm.
“It is hard, especially in the beginning because we didn’t have any support. If you want to learn to grow organic apples you could probably find enough stuff on line, call universities, or get advice from professionals. That wasn’t available for cranberries. As new farmers transitioning to organic we lost a lot of production for the first two years, hence the value added products,” Tantisook said.

cranberry juice

Starvation Alley created a brand of juice that attracted the attention of the emerging craft cocktail industry. The farmers sell their product to 70 accounts, mostly bars in Portland and Seattle. They sell their juice and cranberries at farmers markets and locally at Astoria Co-op. The juice is raw, unsweetened and undiluted cranberries. It is not heated or pasteurized which Tantisook says enhances the health benefits and taste.

Starvation Alley Farms is building its research database with a goal of spreading sustainable farming and educating consumers about the food system and the importance of supporting local farmers. They are working with two other cranberry growers on the Long Beach Peninsula to transition to organic certification. There are currently only about 300 acres of organic cranberry farms in the U.S. out of 39,000 total acres of producing cranberry bogs.

Montinore Estate Wine Tasting

Rudy Marchesi, a winegrower and owner of Montinore Estate, will be at Astoria Co-op Grocery on Thursday May 14, 2015 from 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. offering samples of his wine.  This is part of the fun for Co-op Owner Appreciation Week!

montinore

 

Montinore Estate is a 270 acre certified organic and biodynamic vineyard south of Forest Grove. Biodynamic practices enhance the health and vitality of the farm and subsequently aim to improve quality of the product, making wines more expressive of origin. A pasture, wildflowers, and pond provide habitat for wildlife including beneficial pollinators as well as predatory insects that go after pests.

montinore 1

 

Montinore wines come from the seven varieties of grapes grown on the estate. Half the vineyards are pinot noir, in addition to white wines from grapes that grow well in Oregon; Riesling and pinot gris to name a few.

pinot grisMarchesi purchased Montinore in 2005. When he was growing up, he remembers his grandfather making wine at home. Then in graduate school for clinical psychology, living near vineyards in Sonoma County, Marchesi started making wine himself, and never looked back. That was 40 years ago. In the wine business, his psychology background does come into play, handling the people that come with selling wines in 45 states, several countries, plus up to 30 employees depending on the time of year.

“Working with living systems and organisms is a healthy way to spend my time. It provides a lot of insight into the world around me and it’s very creative, especially on the winemaking end. It is a craft that involves a great deal of subtleties; it heightens our senses as winemakers when we work with these subtleties to create an expression of our farm,” Marchesi said.